Clockwork is proud of and excited by the success that the local CoderDojo group has experienced since it started in April. The Twin Cities chapter was co-founded by Matt Gray, our VP of Technology, and Rebecca Schatz of Code Savvy. Together, we’ve introduced hundreds of kids to the awesomeness of computer programming. 

As a founding sponsor, Clockwork initially supported CoderDojo by hosting the Spring and Summer sessions at our offices, but the demand has been incredible and only grown with each session. After only 5 months of Saturday afternoon classes, we knew we had to find a way to expand.

CoderDojo at the “U”

Clockwork and CoderDojo Twin Cities reached out to MinneWebCon knowing that it could be a fantastic partnership — and they agreed! Starting this fall, MinneWebCon has generously arranged access to classrooms at the University of Minnesota, which means that even more kids can join in the fun (and education… but shhhh, we don’t tell the kids that part!).

Mentors Needed




The opportunity MinneWebCon has given us to serve more kids also means the Twin Cities group needs more mentors. The on-campus space can accommodate three times as many kids, so we also need about three times as many mentors on a given Saturday. 

Contrary to what you may think, you don’t have to be an expert in order to mentor — we welcome anyone from dabblers to pros. Above all else, you have to be supportive and motivated. If this sounds like you and you have skills within any of the following categories, join us! You don’t have to make a season-long commitment. Simply sign up for the days that work for you.  

CoderDojo Skill Areas




  • Arduino
  • Game development with Unity
  • Linux
  • Mobile apps
  • Python
  • Ruby
  • Scratch
  • Web technologies (HTML, CSS, JavaScript) 

All the information you need 

View the fall schedule

Read the mentor FAQs

Sign up to be a mentor

Read what a co-founder and some mentors have to say about CoderDojo 

As a global organization, the CoderDojo movement aims to provide free and accessible opportunities for kids to learn about computer programming. It’s open to kids between the ages of eight and seventeen; all experience levels are welcome. Additionally, computers are available for students that are not able to bring in a laptop, thanks to our sponsors.